How to Choose Your Roofer

We know after a storm you are inundated with choices from all directions and it can be overwhelming. But if you find yourself needing a roof inspection here are things you should look for while trying to choose your roofer:

Red Ladder Roofing & Construction logo up close magnifying glass clip art

Local

Stay local, go with a company who can follow through on any labor warranties they offer and who will be there for support down the road. Choose someone who lives and works in the North Texas area and isn’t going anywhere. Read my blog post about why local matters here.

Online Presence

Do they have a good online presence? You should be able to learn a lot about them online and they shouldn’t be afraid of their reputation being public. Check their BBB rating, Google their business name, read reviews, and see if they are a part of the NTRCA. If they aren’t online at all, run. If you can’t find reviews, run. 

Follow Up and Follow Through

Do they return your calls? Do they show up when they say they will? These are important factors to show you how seriously they take your business. It is true that roofing and product knowledge are important but their ability to run a business well is an important factor too. Their organizational skills show how involved they will be in your project. Good management skills will affect the outcome of your project. 

Good Work Isn't Free

Do they say they can do your roof for nothing? Good work cost money, do you really want a roof protecting your house that was put on by cutting corners? Can you trust them to do the job right on the parts you can and can’t see? Do you have confidence that they will do the job right because its the right way to do it, even if you don’t know? They should be making sure to follow manufacture guidelines to protect the warranty on your shingles. 

If you are paying for your roof out of pocket hopefully you are given clear, written estimates. If there are discrepancies, don’t hesitate to go back and to one you trusted and ask for clarification. Sometimes we can see the estimates aren’t comparing apples to apples since we know the industry better. A good roofer won’t be offended and should be happy to answer your questions and just generally educate you on the industry to help your process along. 

If you are paying for your roof with the help of insurance its a little easier, you know your cost already (your insurance deductible) so you can focus on finding the best company for the job. But if you find yourself needing clarification between your claim and what your roofer tells you, you shouldn’t hesitate to ask a good roofer to explain. We can’t explain your policy to you but we do know claims and we do know construction. Did you know they sometimes have errors? Sometimes measurements are wrong or line items are left off. This can make them fall short of the total they should be.

Insured

Do they have insurance? This is an important one. They should happily supply you with proof of insurance and it should be CURRENT. Ask them if they know if their policy covers open roofs and sub contractors. 

Licensed

If they claim to be licensed, ask them to define that. There is no roofing license in the state of Texas. While we at Red Ladder Roofing would support this change (and its definitely being talked about on a state level) it doesn’t currently exist. So if they claim to be licensed they could mean something as simple as their business is an LLC… which means far less.  They could also be referring to the program offered by RCAT, which makes you RCAT licensed, which is a legitimate accomplishment, just know there is no official state process or license. Although RCAT will probably be heavily involved if/when the day comes to develop such a program. 

This is a video I made in 2019, but it still rings true:

We were here before the storm and we'll be here after.

Red Ladder Roofing, North Texas Roofer, Denton Roofer
Shelby Bell

Shelby Bell

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